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20121027
20121104
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Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30 (some duplicates have been removed)
in that environment, it has been hard to convince others of the need to sustain necessary levels of funding for diplomacy. what we really have is a government with one institution or a collection of institutions that are basically on steroids. the rest of our government, which is essentially on life- support. that is hard to sustain. one of the things i like about the state department is that you need to get back -- get by on cunning and strategy. you do not have the resources the other branches of the government has. the hope that there will be balanced in the account period ahead, the new budget includes the state department as part of the national security as a whole. i would not hold my breath. i think it will be hard making the case robusta diplomacy. my hope is that it will be a bipartisan effort. it will be challenged not matter much. my primary -- it will be challenged no matter what. we need something that will allow our forces to do several things. first, we need a robust change of views on strategy and our overall approach is. the kind of thing that chris laid out on talking abou
think the future operating environment will be? so it's about learning from the past, it's about applying the right lessons, but it's about how does it apply to the future operating environment as we go forward? so we have to update several things. we just rolled out brand new doctrine. the first time the army has done an extensive doctrine in recent memory. and we have published the initial high level documents of our doctrine, we'll start to publish the subelements of this over the next six, eight months. it represents some of the lesson we learn and how we think it a-- it will apply to the future. this is key as we start to look to the future making sure we are based in what we believe is the way forward and we do that by writing doctrine. we have to look at operations, type of operations. what are the best way to train our forces for the future? one of the more important thing is how do we develop leaders? we believe one of the most important things we have to do is adapt our leader development programs. what i mean by this, about adapting leader development programs from the
to be resources going forward. secretary clinton had an absolute heavyweight, but even in that environment it's hard to convince others that they need to sustain the necessary levels of funding for diplomacy. what we really have is a government with one institution or collection of institutions basically on steroids, military and national security and the rest of our government, essentially in my support. that is a very hard team to sustain. one of the things i like about the state department, but one of the things that the challenge as he got to get by and cunning and guile and strategy. if you don't have the programs come you don't have the resources at their riches of the government have. the hope is there's going to be more balance in the period ahead. the new budgeting apparatus includes the state department as part of the national security budget as a whole. but i wouldn't hold my breath. you think it's going to be hard and making the case for robust diplomacy, my hope would be a bipartisan affair, but it's going to be a challenge to matter what. secondly unmelted now,, my primary inter
we think of future operating environment will be? so it's about learning from the past, it's about applying the right lessons but it's about how does it apply to the future operating environment as we go forward. so we have to do several things. we just rolled out brand-new documents for the first time the army has done an extensive rollout of doctrine and recent memory. we published the initial high-level documents of our doctrine and the sub elements over the next six or eight months and represent represents represent some of the lessons we learned in how we think they will apply in the future. this is key as we start to look to the future, making sure we are dazed and what we believe is the way forward and we do that by writing a doctrine. we have to look at operations in the type of operations and what are the best ways train our forces for the future. one of the more important things is how do we develop leaders? we believe one of the most important things we have to do is adapt our leader development program so what i mean by this, this is about adapting leaders from the time
they apply to what we think the future operating environment with the. so with learning from the past, it's about applying the right lessons but it's about how does it apply to the future operating environment as we go forward. so we have to update several things. we just rolled out a brand-new doctrine. the first time the army has been an extensive rollout of doctrine in recent memory. we have published the additional high level documents of our doctrine. we will start to publish the sub elements of this over the next six or eight months and represent some the lessons we've learned how we figure we'll apply to the future. and this is key as we start to look for the future as making sure we are based in what we believe is a way forward and we do that by riding doctrine. we have to look at operations, the type of operations, what are the best way to train our forces for the future, what are more important thing is how do we develop leaders. we believe one of the most important things we have to do is adapt a related development programs. what i mean by this, this is about adapting programs
health and if you are chronically suffering from challenges in the environment or from wherever source, you are going to be not paying a lot of attention to things that are very far away, but how do ye exist, how do i deal with this problem, how do my children and my family deal with these issues and as you are well aware, there are still lots of problems in the world. the good news is there's been a tremendous amount of progress, scientific knowledge that many of you in this room have been major contributors to that. and we have made great strides, and it seems to me that one of the things that ought to motivate us today is to figure out how to leverage the advances in science and medicine directly benefit every person in this world that has a need that can be satisfied, salt, resolved or ameliorated by these advancements, and that's a task that we have in front of us. and why i am interested in being here, why i am participating in this and why there is still a lot of work to be done. now that you are all here no one signs the room without signing a pledge to donate a significant amo
approval rating -- of an approval rating in this environment getting thrown out, getting rejected. caller: he covers politics for the "philadelphia inquirer." the poll out this morning -- results available online. thank you for being with us. let's give back your phone calls. mike joins us from pennsylvania, democrat line. good morning. caller: good morning. my question is, with the controversy around the voter i.d. issue, the republican legislature suppressing turnout, do you think this will in any way suppress turnout and, if so, will it be enough to effect the margins in any way? thanks. host: thanks for the call. guest: last march, the legislature passed a law that requires pennsylvania voters to show up with one of six approved photo id is. if you did not have one in the meantime, the state would provide you with one. you had to go through certain procedures to get a photo id. more recently, in the last few weeks, a state judge simply set aside that particular provision of the law so that pennsylvanian is on november 6 -- you'll be asked to show one of those six forms of id. if you d
. the pentagon had declared cyberspace the environment of people and machines and networks, as a new domain of war. and yet, we realized that maybe one in a thousand people really understood what cyberspace was and the degree and depth of the vulnerabilities. and so what we're trying to do in the zero day series is to take pieces of it and explain the fundamentals and the platoon i can idea is that -- p mr. speaker atonic idea is everybody from my mom and dad and to people in the congress, everybody can understand and so maybe start the process of coming up with ways to defend cyberspace better. >> cyberspace vulnerabilities, monday night at 8:00 p.m. eastern on "the communicators" on c-span2. >> president obama went to the headquarters of the federal emergency management agency today to get an update on preparations for hurricane sandy. the national response coordination center in washington is where fema is managing the deployment of federal resources to states along the east coast, ahead of the storm. >> thank you. >> keep it up. thank you. >> great job. >> >> across the country are conc
environment. when jack markell ran he put together a blueprint for delaware. we have not done a good enough job of creating that environment. >> let us go to the follow up. we stand on the blueprint for delaware? >> we still of war to go. some of them we did not have the resources. i said we ought to agree to dollar version. we have not been able to add as much as we would like. mr. gregg can say hispanic, but it is not spin. it is not spin to the people -- jeff craig can say is sprin. in. these are real jobs, real family is being put back to work. >> feel free to offer your opinion. >> it is then 30,000 unemployed from 18,000 additional who have dropped out of the workforce, people of taken part-time jobs, we can argue, but on election day those people will go to the polls and make a decision. >> of cited the high percentage of people in delaware and a part of their paychecks from the government. if you are to trim down the government are produced exasperatingly problem? >> i moved to delaware in the late 1980's. today the largest employer is the state of delaware, the second largest is th
to be thrown into thn chaotic, swirling environment of a dense neighborhood in jakarta, indonesia, not knowing the language, not knowing anything, looking a little different. he had to fend for himself. every step along the way, there was some aspect, deep aspect of him where he was alone. >> narrator: then, when he was ten, his mother sent him to hawaii to live with his grandparents. >> i think it's natural to assume that your father be absent, then form a relationship with your stepfather, and then be separated from him and be separated from your mother and go live with your grandparents who at that point you don't really know that well... it must have been profoundly unsettling. >> his early life is a constant stream of people leaving, of him being left. his mother, his father, his grandparents constantly moving. his whole life is really a, sort of a classic search for home. >> narrator: they lived in a small two-bedroom high-rise apartment in honolulu. >> his grandfather was a heavy drinker. what surprised me as i was researching my book was actually the president himself telling me that h
it would be like at age six to be thrown into the chaotic, swirling environment of a dense neighborhood in jakarta, indonesia, not knowing the language, not knowing anything, looking a little different. he had to fend for himself. every step along the way, there was some aspect, deep aspect of him where he was alone. c2 >> nrator: then, when he wasas ten, h mothesent him t to ve with his grandparents >> i think is natura assume thayour fbe absent, then fm a reship wi yr ster, and en be separat from him and ber sepad fr yr mo and go liv yougrandpar o at that point you don' ally knoat w it mushave bn profound unseng. >> h early l a cstant stream opeople lving, h beg left his moer, his ther, his grandpar cstany moving his whole life is really a, sort of a classic search for home.mo >> narrator: they lived in a small two-bedroom high-rise apartment in honolulu. >> his grandfather was a heavy drinker. what surprised me as i was researching my book was actually the president himself telling me that his grandmother was an alcoholic, too. >> narrator: but barry had gotten lucky. hawaii's most
back. personal income tax and we need to create a stable business environment. we have not done a good enough job creating that environment and that is borne out by the numbers. >> where do you stand on your blueprint for delaware? >> we have implemented the majority of items in their and we have more to go. some of them we did not have the resources. i said we ought to create a delaware version of a cops bill. we have made progress there as well. it is not spin to the hundreds of workers were back at the refinery. it is not spin to the people who decided to expand in delaware. it is not spin to the folks at foxfire printing who are adding dozens of jobs. it is not spin to the people at jpmorgan chase. these are real jobs, real families being put back to work. >> fill free to offer your opinion. >> 18,000 additional individuals who have dropped out of the work force, people who have taken part-time jobs, we can argue back and forth about the numbers but those people go to the polls and i will make a decision based on their own personal experience. >> >> you cited the number of people w
or the environment and not a single vote talks about transportation infrastructure. not a single one of those votes were dealing with education or a single one on gun control. all things that i think are important to people in the tenth district and i think are critical votes get my opponent doesn't want to talk about it. schneider: if you look at the record this congress which is the most ineffective congress we have had in our lifetime you voted on the ryan plan that takes medicare and turns it into a voucher program. he voted with congress over 200 times against our environment and over 28 times against obamacare. he has voted with them on issue after issue on every -- >> moderator: congressman's dold you voted against obamacare. why? dold: if we look at the affordable care act, we can agree there things are things that are very -- i think we want to call it by its name and frankly i don't want to offend somebody that might want to call it something else but the long and short of it is i think we have 21 new taxes on this.
an understanding of an environment -- if you come back to - 0, about focusing on the customer and producing products that our customers really want and value, it is an understanding in a sense of the economics, distribution, vehicles, the supply base. i talk about the 12,000 jobs at ford, the jobs in the supply base and related engineering activities. i really just keep coming back to the market itself, the opportunity to put great vehicles out there, to focus on the things people really want, and to talk back to the high- tech jobs. historically, our industry, particularly the domestic manufacturers in the detroit area -- for now, competitors of rust belt. we made a commitment to engineer the highest quality vehicles that offer the best fuel economy in every sector the we compete in every market around the world. if you come back to some of the investments i mentioned earlier, a very large percentage of those investments have been in very high-technology power trends, weather they are hybrid vehicles, battery, electronic vehicles. we now have six electrified the nichols we will be selling
discussions about. actually, one of them was the environment and how we cover the environment. every time we tried to do a prime-time special we would not get a rating, and that led -- one of the chapters are right about this, where i don't come across well, we had leonardo dicaprio at one point, president clinton, and i get killed for it. i did not intend, but we did a prime-time environmental special , and dicaprio was the chairman of earth day that year, and we talk to my that he would make an appearance at the end -- ended up interviewing the president. that was an attempt to try to cover the environment and a serious way and drive an audience. i was concerned, frankly, about our terrorism coverage. we did more than other people did. john miller, our correspondent went in an interview bin laden, the last western journalist the trekked into the mountains in afghanistan, and we did a prime-time special or two, but i had some dealings with the military in washington he said their biggest concern was an act of domestic terrorism. we had active discussions about doing more. in retrospect wish
of how are we going to survive this new environment. publishing is in a precarious position in some ways, and a lot of people think about that. we are constantly trying to change and adapt and sing on top of things. like adding e-books to our website. we are having a website in order we bring in new products all the time and more things that are nonbook items in the store that people really enjoy for gift giving. we definitely have to stay on top of things to make sure we are checking what the next place as we can be going. where are you going to browse? where you going to browse them, where you going to get ideas? well, i personally did not want amazon controlling everything. they are not the people. they are internet people. we want to making the decisions on what gets published and what gets out to the people. if you really want an independent bookstores, it might not >> finding something new by favorite author that he didn't know about. we value the people that work there. >> we continue our look at the literary culture of montpelier, vermont. we hear from the author michaeld coffin
of difficult to imagine a president with with that high of approval in this kind of environment the getting thrown out, getting rejected. host: thomas fitzgerald, who covers politics for "the philadelphia inquirer." thank you for being with us. but it back to your phone calls. mike from pennsylvania, democratic line. good morning. caller: the morning, steve and terry. with controversy about the voter id lot to suppress turnout, do you think that this will in any way suppress turnout? if so, will it be enough to affect the margins in any way? thanks. guest: last march, the legislature passed a law that required pennsylvania voters to show up with one of six approved photo id's. if you did not have one, they would provide you with one but you have to go through certain procedures to get one. more recently, in the last three weeks, a judge in our states simply set aside that particular provision of law so that when pennsylvanian is go to vote on november 6th, you will be asked to show one of those six forms of identification. if you do not have one, you will still be permitted to vote. your vo
an environment in washington, d.c., where we are working together. we are trying to create an environment of working together. it is a political year. of course she is going to endorse the senator that best represents her local view, which is connected. >> senator, your turn. >> she did not endorse me. she just said what the record was. politics should never trump jobs. the problem was not wanting to invest in this country. clean water and clean air, it is a $3 billion industry, and we can have both, but you need regulations, and 50 days before an election they announced three years ago they are going to kill the plant. >> he brought us the company from an action the epa took, and epa was told by the chamber of commerce that if you took that action if you voted not to suspend the rules, they would not have to prevent it. that is the problem. you see bureaucrats are dictating policy in montana. we can do just fine. >> the congressman has talked about 95% and other things that are patently false. they said they could deal with these rules. the problem they have is with ash and hayes. they c
these votes not a single one talked about women's healthcare or the environment, not a single one talked about the votes education or a single one on gun control. all things that i think are important to the 10th district and i think are critical votes. >> if we look at the record of this congress which is the most ineffective congress we've had in our life times. he voted twice on the ryan plan and voucher program. he voted with this congress over 200 times against our environment. over 28 times genls obamacare. he's voted with them on issue after issue. >> you raced an important one. congressman dole your votes on obama care you voted against it is why? >> the affordable care ak act, there are things positive. >> you call it the affordable care act as opposed to obamacare? >> we need to call it by its name. we have 2 new taxes on this. the estimates on the new set of 10 years doubled so this is going to be troubling. >> it didn't double. >> it did. after two years it is doubling so i think this is troubling because small businesses are looking at how can i pay the penalty and tell people the
in a highly politicized and highly charged political environment, we simply, as the white house, and as the state department has collected information, they have gotten its to the american public. host: democrat from florida. go ahead? all right, we're going to move on to barbara. angie, are you with us? you are on the air. caller: when americans wake up on november 7th, they have been made the right choice of president obama. -- corporations running their country, they will regret their choice for ever. everything the president has done -- doing it -- he inherited bankruptcy of the whole country. -- shipped off the jobs to foreign countries. i lived through that. i have been a refugee almost all of my life. guest: a couple of the important points that you bring up -- one of them is that, i do believe that voters in florida and the voters in iowa, and voters across the country understand the depth of what this president and his team faced when it came in. today is the anniversary of the great crash in 1929. the dow did not come back to its pre-1929 levels until 1954. that is wha
environment. >> thank you. chris, so you start running drugs for a man named jeff andrews. can you describe for us the worst experience when you're heading up to wichita, right? >> yes, i never did drugs, so i don't understand the drug culture per se, but i'll never forget the first drug load iran was over 100 pounds. and we negotiated the price. i get in the car and start driving and all i can think was man, what happens if my car breaks down? what happens if i get a flat tire? what happens if they get in a wreck? i was out over the fact drugs or in my car. at that point, delusions and paranoia starts speaking in nbc's ghost behind every tree in cops behind every bush. i really thought i was going insane in that moment. >> she had a particularly ingenious disguise i thought. >> well, there's a ski mountain south of el paso sectors and skis in the car at the ski report. when i hit the border patrol check point, the border agent, they'd never question me before. when i was running drugs have as much younger and of course much better looking because i had hair. [laughter] so you would've neve
environment it's also very difficult to see or to guarantee that various rebel groups will not turn their arms on each other. unfortunately, the situation in syria has already deteriorated to such a point that even if assad were to magically disappear tomorrow, that would not spell the end of the conflict or the problems in syria. there are significant issues now at play. significant sectarian tensions as well as ethnic tensions between kurds and arabs and so forth. the third argument is that if the u.s. arms or helps to arm these opponents, it will translate into greater u.s. influence over those who eventually run syria. again, history proves that that is not the case. so i, so let me, let me, with that, with my two minutes that i've now been told i have left, let me move and try to end on a positive note which is, essentially, my own sense is that the downside risks of a military option in syria are significant. i also think the fact that we have reached the point we have reached with the conflict which is to say such a significant escalation of horrific violence inside the country as well
going forward. secretary clinton's been an absolute heavyweight, but even in that environment it's opinion hard to convince others of the need to sustain necessary levels of funding fur diplomacy -- for diplomacy. what we really have is a government with one institution or a collection of institutions that are basically on steroids, our military and national security, and the rest of our government which is, essentially, on life support. and that's a very hard thing to sustain. and so one of the things i like about the state department but one of the things that's a challenge is that you've got to get by on cunning and gilens and strategy. because you don't have the programs, you don't have the resources that the other branches of the government has. so the hope is there's going to be more balance in the period ahead. the new budgeting apparatus includes the state department as part of the national security budget as a whole with. but i wouldn't hold my breath. i think making the case for robust diplomacy, my hope will be a bipartisan effort, but it's going to be a challenge no m
. caller: there you go. my question is, i am 50 years old and worked 30 years in this environment and i never struggled for a job. we got thousands of people from wisconsin out here working. saving their livelihood, save their families. president obama wants to take away hydraulic fracturing after he's re-elected. and the coal industry. i'd like to hear your thoughts. guest: i think you have a good right to be nervous. the president obviously was a little deceptive during these debates here. you think he was for tracking and the keystone pipeline. all these issues. but frankly you got to judge the president not by what he said in these debates. you got to judge him by his record. the president needs to -- it the president spent $400 million, kind of trashing mitt romney, before the first debate. and trying to build up people's negatives about mitt romney. that disappeared in about 10 minutes in the first debate. and we have seen that now all across the country. for folks like you in north dakota, but frankly in all the states, you got to look at these two candidates and say, who is real
't see it on the nightly news to say we have to cover this war? one was the environment every time we tried to do a prime-time special meehan leonardo dicaprio interview president clinton and i was killed for it. we did the prime-time special he was the chairman of earth day i thought he would make an appearance be interviewed the president. that was the attempt. but we did more tears them coverage before 9/11. we did a prime-time special but the military said the biggest concern it is enacted of terrorism of. i wish we had done more. education is not covered in the depth that it should be. some of our difficult to do with television. >> host: how much pressure is there to do entertainment as news? lindsay lohan or the superficiality? to seem that journalism has gone down is there pressure what is the news? >> there was the disagreement with princess diana coverage after she died and peter said it was a terrible idea but then came around. it was a constant battle within myself and is a line it has moved the cronkite book those issues have been around even walter cronkite did things th
Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30 (some duplicates have been removed)

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